Vauxhall Agila

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Vehicle Highlights

The New Vauxhall Agila – Flex in the city!

  • Vauxhall’s city car offers funky good looks and huge practicality
  • Five doors, five seats, 1,050 litres of luggage space – no compromises!
  • Low emissions and running costs

If you’re looking to add a bit of spice to your Flex life, then Vauxhall’s New Agila should be the first item on your shopping list!

This addition to Vauxhall’s stylish, dynamic and versatile model range went on sale in Spring 2008, and brought with it new levels of style and flexibility to urban motorists.

It was designed from the outset to offer all of the desirability that urban motorists require, without any compromise in terms of its practicality.

“We wanted to give our smallest model considerably more charm than ever before without compromising its functionality,” says chief designer Uwe Müller. “With its rather cheeky look and immense flexibility, the Agila fits perfectly into the current Vauxhall model portfolio.”

At the front, the car is typically Vauxhall. Its distinctive grille, almond-shaped lamp units and trademark raised crease line mark it out as the smallest member of an incredibly stylish family, while throughout the car certain styling cues, such as the tapered front and rear bumpers, steeply raked side crease and angular window line show commonality with other models in the Vauxhall range.

The interior ambience is just as stylish as the outside, with a wide selection of colour lines and high quality materials throughout, while thoughtful touches include an ergonomically positioned gear stick and pod-mounted rev counter, angled towards the driver.

Market

The Agila entered the rapidly growing small monocab market, one of the fastest growing sectors across Europe, where it accounted for over 1.1 million new registrations in 2007.

In the UK, almost 94,264 small monocabs were registered in 2007, with urban dwellers under increasing pressure to downsize and reduce their carbon emissions.

Aimed at youthful buyers and independent females in particular, although not exclusively, the Agila competes directly with such cars as the Fiat Panda, Renault Modus, Honda Jazz and Suzuki Splash.

Its creative use of interior space, along with five doors and five three-point seatbelts in the rear mean it will appeal in particular to those buyers who want the most flexibility possible from a city car, while its impressive build quality and use of high quality materials throughout mean it also proves that a city car doesn’t have to be cheaply finished to be cost-effective to own and run.

Flex Appeal

The Agila features impressive load carrying capacity, with a colossal 1,050 litres of usable boot space with the rear seats dropped and parcel shelf removed.

It is full of thoughtful touches, too, such as the FlexLoad false floor in the boot, through which an extra 35 litres of secure, hidden storage can be accessed, carrier bag shopping hooks in the load bay, extra wide door pockets and a broad, almost square tailgate aperture all adding to its practical appeal. The joy of Flex was never far from the designers’ minds when turning Agila from a concept into reality.

The interior layout is such that it offers what we believe to be the best possible level of comfort in such a small package. The height-adjustable front seats (S/SE) and tall roofline combine to give an incredible feeling of space, while the rear seat comes with three three-point seatbelts, allowing five adults to travel in safety.

Engines

The Agila is available with two different engines – two all-alloy lightweight petrol units.

The entry-level powerplant is a three-cylinder, 1.0-litre petrol engine based on that found in the previous generation Agila, and renowned for its free-revving, lively nature. The unit produces 65PS and 90Nm of torque, feels lively and accelerates from 0-62mph in 14.7 seconds, with a top speed of 99mph. With fuel consumption figures of up to 64.2mpg, it is also one of the most fuel efficient petrol engines available!

Moving up the engine range, the Agila 1.2i 16v has a surprisingly potent power output for its size, with 86PS and 114Nm of torque. It accelerates from 0-62mph in 12.6 seconds and has a top speed of 109mph.

Both petrol units come with a five-speed manual gearbox as standard, but for the first time there is also an automatic option for Agila. Available only on the Agila 1.2i 16v, it is mated to a four-speed automatic gearbox.

Dynamics

Agila has an inexpensive yet effective suspension layout. A new subframe at the front plays an essential part in its sharp, precise handling. The set-up uses MacPherson struts supported by A-shaped suspension arms that are much lower than those of its predecessor, allowing for the same level of ride comfort but with greater steering precision.

At the rear, the new model features a torsion bar in place of the outgoing Agila’s stiff beam axle, which improves handling and ride comfort, while for even greater peace of mind ESP is offered as an option on all models.

Driver appeal is enhanced by speed-dependent power steering, which has just 3.2 turns from lock-to-lock making the car both easy to manoeuvre at parking speeds and stable while cruising.  Engineers have also reduced the car’s turning circle despite its wider track to an easily manageable 9.6 metres kerb-to-kerb, ideal for those tight to squeeze into parking spots.

Specs and prices

Agila is available in three trim levels in the UK. The entry-level Expression, is available only with the 1.0i 12v engine, while the plusher S, is offered with both the 1.0i 12v and 1.2i 16v VVT engine choices and the option of automatic transmission on the 1.2. The top-of-the range SE comes with 1.2i 16v VVT in both manual and auto.

Prices range from £8,790 to £12,860.